All posts tagged: photography lessons in Tokyo

Playstation VR Portraits

Well there you have it – you think that you’re on a roll blogging regularly for a month or so and then shit hits the fan – work wise – and you fall off the bandwagon for about a third of the year. That’s always the way of things as a professional photographer – you’re either too busy to blog or you have too much time and you have to blog. Guess which phase I’m in now? Anyway with Tokyo Game Show coming up this weekend I’d like to introduce some portraits I shot for the wonderful folks at Polygon, one of the world’s top websites dedicated to video game journalism. The article that these photos accompanied was about the long road of development of Playstation VR – the virtual reality headset for – ou guessed it – the Playstation soon to be released around the world. The article itself is very in-depth and definitely worth a read; you can check it out on the Polygon website here: http://www.polygon.com/2016/3/9/11174194/the-making-of-playstation-vr. For my part – I was glad to meet …

Are you having fun yet? Why test shooting is important

We live in interesting times for photography. Technology has changed the landscape of the craft beyond recognition over the past 5 years. Each new generation of cameras outstrips the models of the previous years by exponential factors. Professional grade RAW video is cheaper than ever. Photography has never been easier to learn, and as a result hundreds of new ‘professionals’ are flooding into the industry, stars in their eyes with the promise of glamor-filled photoshoots. Some of these photographers are terrible. Most of them are decent. Enough of them are phenomenal. There are countless photographers out there better than you, and a scary amount of them are younger than you. Every day that you aren’t shooting photos, thousands of truly awesome photos are being made – and none of them are yours. Everyday that you don’t pick up the camera, that you decide to ‘take a break’, the rest of the photography world surges on ahead of you and without you. Not to mention that technology convergence means that photographers need to learn other disciplines; …

GAIJIN – Scott T. Hards: CEO, HobbyLink Japan

Here’s another notable gaijin: meet Scott T. Hards, the founder and CEO of HobbyLink Japan, the country’s biggest exporter of Japanese hobby-related goods. Back when I was a young nerdy lad living in Australia, I really wish there had been a site like this where I could get my hands on the latest Gundam model kits (not that I could afford it). As it was, back in the 1990s Japanese anime-related goods were extremely hard to come by and where available they were at extremely inflated prices. Scott originally came to Japan as a banker, and like many of us, just ended up staying. He eventually went into the business of exporting, starting out in a small apartment in Tokyo, and over the years his business has grown to the point where it operates out of a gigantic UFO-shaped warehouse in Sano, Tochigi, and employs several dozen people, both local and international. HobbyLink Japan exports to all countries, satisfying the otaku needs of nerds everywhere around the globe. How I shot this photo: This is …

Aiko

Well, wow, I got a pretty big response for the PMS project on Facebook and email – so I’m going to go ahead with that it seems. Looking for ladies willing to be subjects for this – drop me a line in the Contact section or in the comments! This shot below is of my girlfriend’s grandmother taken while we were visiting Hawaii in March.  She’s a sweet chatty, generous old lady that loves to tell stories. She has a great bar fridge full of Pepsi which is awesome for me and she likes to sit in her favorite chair and drink coffee and chat.  Her husband passed away last year, which was a very sad time for the lady and her family. Like a lot of older people she gets forgetful sometimes and loses track of things.  Not sure whether it’s Alzheimer’s but it’s a bit of a worry. I photographed her at her old family home which is near Haleiwa, which is one of the coolest places to shoot I’ve ever been in. I also …

Yoyogi Boxing Gym

Here’s another batch of photos shot at a recent workshop I held in Yoyogi, Tokyo.  The great thing about teaching photography in Tokyo is that you are always surprised at who will become willing subjects for your students – this time it was  student Rob Piazza who introduced this boxing gym to us, so we were very lucky to have two obliging and aspiring boxers to pose for us. We used Nikon speedlights (a combination of SB-800s and SB-900s) to illuminate our subjects with Honl snoots and the Orbis ringflash for the second and third photo.  Great fun was had by all – especially the boxers, who were very much getting into the spirit of things, as you can see from the last photo! Lighting workshops run every weekend – this week:  Lighting 101 for those who need a primer on flash to begin feeling confident about it.  Email irwin@irwinwong.com if you feel like checking it out. Thanks to everyone who keeps coming out to these workshops – it’s always great to be in a …

The Importance of Having Watt-Seconds

One of my biggest concerns with my speedlighting kit is whether I’ll have enough flash power to make a dent in broad daylight. Of course, using large lights is always an option but not always feasible unless you have a gimp to carry around several battery packs and heads. So when someone suggested we do a couple of shots into the high 2pm afternoon sun, I looked at my two speedlights and knew it wasn’t going to work.  Of course, I didn’t figure on the small armada of Nikon speedlights the students had brought with them, which in total added up to 6 or 7, I can’t remember. What followed was a small debacle that ended up with a forest of tripods and lightstands divided into two groups. The strobes were ganged up to overpower the bright midday sun and it was enough to beat down the daylight enough to get a dramatic mood going. This really demonstrates the importance of having enough flash power, as a shot like this wouldn’t have been possible with …

Marissa @ abandoned train yard

Some shots from the weekend. Sorry for the late update guys, but things have been getting busier. This is Marissa – and as is fairly evident she does a great job modeling. The location was the industrial complex at Ougimachi, where there was an excellent section of unused train track for shooting. At least, we were hoping it was unused – no one ended up under a train so that was a good thing.        

Teva and Gen – Workshop

Big thanks to all who attended the session on Sunday!  As is always the case it’s the models and the students who provide the most creative energy, with me just sitting around in the background fiddling with lights.  Occasionally I do get to take the odd shot though, and here’s a couple from the workshop. Here’s a shot of first-time model Teva – you wouldn’t believe it was her first time in front of a camera, would you? Very difficult to concentrate looking through a lens when you’ve got that innocent yet strangely perilous gaze staring back down at you. Next is Gen, who is a dancer, and had a physique that would definitely bring more ladies to these shoots. I only managed to get shots of him with his shirt on though – sorry ladies.

Nourah – Workshop

Had a studio session on Saturday that I’ve been looking forward to for ages.  I was lucky enough to get a hold of professional belly dance instructor and dancer Nourah, who is seriously amazing to see perform. I’ve been privileged to work with Nourah before, but this is the first time I’ve gotten her into a studio to myself, and to her credit she just looked amazing in front of the camera. Many thanks to Justin and Alex for coming along and another special thanks to Justin for lending his SB900. Here are some of the shots:   Did this with three lights – 1 SB900 in a snoot pointed at her face from camera left 1/32 power, 1 SB800 bounced into a reflector for fill from the lens axis at 1/8 power, and 1 red-gelled SB-900 behind the sheer piece of fabric at 1/2 power.  1/250 sec at f6.3, though that might have changed as we fiddled around with things. These shots are some of my favourites from the session.  Used a 24″ Apollo …