All posts tagged: Lighting

Japan Travel Photography: Sake Brewing for Air Canada Enroute Magazine

Around this time last year Enroute Magazine, Air Canada’s stellar inflight mag got in touch with me to shoot one of my favorite stories of the year – sake brewing in three different prefectures in Japan. The first city was a real treat – Tendo city in Yamagata, which is home of Dewazakura and Mitobe sake, both very famous but operating on vastly different scales. The combination of snow and steam from the rice and hot water made for some of my favorite sake brewing photographs ever, and I’ve photographed a lot of breweries! The next city was Nagoya, a major city in Japan but also home to some of the best breweries in the country. The first stop was Kuheiji Sake Brewery, whose owner believes in the idea that terroir has a great influence over the taste of sake, much like wine. He is also trying barrel-aged sake as a way of introducing something new to the market. Next in Nagoya we went to the absolutely magnificent Marutani sake bar and restaurant- a real …

Japanese Crafts: Ozeki Lantern in Gifu

Late last year I had the opportunity to travel to Gifu, Japan to photograph the superb craftsmen at the Ozeki lantern workshop. Not many people know this but during the Shogunate Gifu was a cultural and economical hub due to a combination of geography and high quality natural resources. Gifu is surprisingly famous for a large number of core crafts, including smithing, washi (paper) production, bamboo crafts and the like – and as a result a great deal of higher level crafts flourished in the city as well – such as lanterns, which used a combination of the high quality materials produced in the area. . For the most part, the lanterns made at Ozeki are decorative interior lanterns – different to the ones I photographed in Kyoto, which were mainly for outdoor use (a blog post for another time!). For this purpose, the lanterns needed to be compact and aesthetically pleasing, requiring a much more delicate approach and also an artistic design sensibility. The bamboo ribs are far more delicate and closer spaced than …

Tokyo Portraits: Kengo Kuma, again

Recently I was asked to photograph a portrait of renowned Japanese architect Kengo Kuma for the third time, and it was to be at his office in Gaienmae again too. I definitely wanted to try something different to the first two times I had photographed him, and also wanted to have him pictured with bamboo, which is a medium he draws a lot of inspiration from. We shot at a bamboo grove at a shrine across the road from his office (which he helped design, incidentally), and he was a wonderful subject as always, barely batting an eyelid when I asked him to pop his head in between the two stalks of bamboo. Kengo Kuma is the man behind the design of the 2020 Olympic Stadium currently being built in Gaien. Hope I get to sit in it in 2020!

Hyundai/Genesis Design Center in Korea

Being a photographer in Tokyo is enough of a treat by itself, but sometimes I am privileged to go to other countries to take photos. This particular time I was sent to Hyundai/Genesis’s research and development lab in Korea. I had never been to Korea before so it was very refreshing navigating in a country where language was once again a barrier. The lab was about 90 minutes out from Seoul but I managed to get there without issues, and on time too! Once there I was treated with great hospitality and the design directors SangYup Lee and Luc Donkerwolke were very generous with their time. It was all in all a very tiring day as I flew over without an assistant, but after I got back to my hotel in Seoul, I had randomly stumbled across some of the best fried chicken I’d ever had in my life. So needless to say I’m very keen to go back to Korea and explore more! Enjoy the photos!  

Shibari Portraits with Hajime Kinoko and Kasumi (Probably NSFW?)

I did a collaborative shoot with master shibari, or kinbaku practitioner Hajime Kinoko and the lovely model Kasumi (who I have photographed before here). Shibari, or the Japanese art of erotic rope binding, is a really big subculture here, and one that I have been meaning to dop my toe into a little more, hopefully I can find more people willing to work with me. For this shot I used a 4×5 Tachihara film camera, because these cameras are really awesome and should be used more. I wrote about the process of shooting 4×5 at length in a previous blog post here. Anyway enjoy the photos! And probably don’t open these at work! (Unless nudity is allowed at work, in which case we’re all jealous)

It’s…The Year of The Pig!

Happy New Year from this Tokyo photographer! As is tradition I make a New Year’s Poster based on the Chinese Zodiac with some of my good friends. 2019 is the Year of the Pig, and last year I didn’t manage to get out to enough movies to watch anything super inspirational for the poster, but I did manage to binge the whole series of Avatar: The Last Airbender on Netflix while I was on business trips in my hotel rooms, and I loved it. This year’s poster is (very loosely) based on that series and features four eco-warriors (top: Drone Pilot/Photographer Hamish Campbell, right: Fashion Creator Yuka, bottom: My Wife Asuka and left: Makeup Artist Maiko Mita) set against industry, greed and environmental destruction, as represented by the pig general at the very top; me. Credit must go to Yuka, who did an absolutely incredible job of coordinating these amazing costumes out of flea market goods. Maiko as usual did a stellar job of turning me into a menacing deformed pig, and thanks to Hamish for stepping …

The Shikoku Files – Mutemuka Sake and Shochu Distillery

In the previous post I detailed how we stayed in a lovely guest house called Kuro Usagi in Kochi prefecture, and also how they brew their own potent form of bathtub rice wine called doburoku. Well, during dinner we managed to sample a few pitchers of the stuff and things got somewhat blurry after all that, although I do remember yelling at Rod from Shikoku Tours about how Dragonball Z is to Japanese pop culture like Shakespeare was to the English language. I don’t think he understood or accepted my position. I do remember waking up the next morning at 6am feeling awful, and upon staggering to the car we then proceeded to drive two hours through an interminable stretch of mountain roads whose twists and turns threatened to make me hurl on more than one occasion. I’m not sure how Rod managed to keep us on the road, as he had had quite as much as I had the previous night, but thanks to him we arrived at our next location largely unscathed, albeit much grayer …

Tokyo Portraits: Accidental Icon (Lyn Slater)

A couple of months ago my amazingly talented friend and Tokyo-based kimono stylist Anji Salz messaged me excitedly and told me one of her fashion idols had agreed to do a collaboration with her. This fashion idol was one Accidental Icon aka Lyn Slater, professor at Fordham University who had – yes – accidentally become an extremely popular Instagram icon. One look at her feed was enough to convince me that I wanted to photograph her, and so it was that we all gathered on a freezing early February morning near Harajuku’s famous fashionista street, Takeshita Street to take some photos before the crowds rolled in. Ms. Slater herself was warm and cooperative, bearing with my constant changes in settings and posing with the patience of a saint – and that’s saying something considering how cold it was on that day. We wrapped up just as the rain came in and retreated into a cafe for some well deserved hot coffee. The haori jacket and demon mask obi (belt) are antiques provided by the very …

Japan Portraits: Shuho Hananofu – Ikebana Master

Around December last year I did a little photo portrait project with the wonderful folks at Kyoto Journal, centering around profiling entrepreneurial women in Kyoto. Here’s one of the amazing ladies that I photographed, which incidentally made the cover of Kyoto Journal issue 89, a very handsome magazine which is available now. Here is an excerpt from the very top of the article, written by the talented Elle Murrell, one of the most fun writers I’ve ever had the privilege of working with: “Hananofu Shuho is an ikebana master who was in charge of flower study section at Jisho-ji, better known as Ginkakuji, the ‘Silver Pavilion’ – one of Kyoto’s most famous temples – for 10 years. Since leaving the Center for Cultural Studies (Jisho-ji Kenshu dojo) there in 2015, she continues teaching her art form, leading several classes per month in Kyoto, Tokyo and Kyushu. Her students come from all over Japan and even from China for these intimate sessions.’ I’ve seen Shuho-san do ikebana performances on several occasions, and I’m always struck by …

Tokyo Portraits – Maezawa Yuusaku for Forbes

Earlier this year I was commissioned by Forbes to photograph a portrait of Maezawa Yuusaku, the billionaire CEO of Zozotown and art collector who has gained notoriety recently for dropping a record amount of money on an original Basquait. Unfortunately at the time of shooting the Basquait wasn’t available to be photographed alongside Mr Maezawa, so here he is pictured alongside his original Picasso in one of his offices at his Chiba headquarters. When I first entered the office the wooden wall really struck my fancy as I knew it would look gorgeous lit with my strobes, however there wasn’t anywhere to hang the Picasso. This meant that they would have to knock some holes into that beautiful wooden wall in order to hang the painting for the photos – something which I was loathe to ask for, however once I checked out every other area I could use for photos I became convinced that this was my spot. A little bit of polite wheedling and assurances that the photos would be worth the effort, …